speed breeding and drones are the future of wheat production

Integrating modern plant breeding technologies to wheat production is vital to sustain global populations in the future, according to some researchers. Dr Lee Hickey, research fellow at the University of Queensland, will be running a workshop looking at 'speed breeding' and the use of drones at the 9th International Wheat Conference in Sydney next week. Dr Hickey and other scientists at the university developed speed breeding in 2013 from technologies developed by NASA.

 

 

Speed breeding accelerates the genetic gain in wheat, and is resistant to stripe rust and pre-harvest sprouting, which are common reasons for yield loss. "It's a great tool to develop wheat varieties faster [because] wheat breeding is slow; it can take 10 sometimes 20 years to develop a new and improved variety," Dr Hickey said.

"Companies are starting to use it now to breed varieties in Australia which is fantastic."  Dr Hickey said other emerging technologies are also proving valuable for farmers on the field. He said the workshops at the global conference are aimed at early career breeders and scientists. "It's very important that we are attracting young people into science and wheat improvement," he said.

"We need new ideas, we need to be thinking outside of the box because we face some pretty big challenges in the future to grow a growing population."

source: abc website

 

lee-hicley-speed-wheat researcher-speeds-wheat-breeding
Lee Hickey is growing plants under lights to speed the breeding process up six times.
"We need new ideas, we need to be thinking outside of the box  because we face some pretty big challenges in the future to grow a growing population.
Lee Hickey, University of Queensland research fellow
speed breeding and drones are the future of wheat production
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